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April 14th, 2014
Quiche is one of those dishes that I never imagined I would end up loving this much. In my house I always grew up with eggs on toast, toad in a hole and fritatta’s, all lovingly made by my mum and grandma for me. But one day I found this recipe and had to make it. It was perfect, there was a package of spinach about to go bad sitting in the fridge, so instead of throwing it out I threw it in a pan with olive oil and garlic and turned it into a quiche. It is know a dish that I know my heart and could probably do it with my eyes closed - even with a hot oven and stove.
Spinach Quiche with Pine Nuts


Ingredients: 

 1 frozen 9-inch ready-made whole wheat piecrust 
 1 1/2 tablespoon olive oil 
 2 large cloves garlic, sliced 
 6 cups fresh spinach leaves, washed and dried 
 1 teaspoon salt 
 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper 
 1 teaspoon dried sage or 1 tablespoon fresh sage, chopped 
 3 tablespoons pine nuts, toasted 
 1/2 cup cheddar cheese, grated 
 1/2 cup milk 
 2 large eggs 
 1 large red potato, steamed until firm-tender, sliced 1/4-inch thick 



Method: 

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Remove piecrust from the freezer and thaw for ten minutes. Prick the bottom with a fork and bake for 7 to 10 minutes, until lightly browned. Remove crust from the oven to cool.Heat olive oil in a medium sauté pan. Add garlic, spinach, salt, pepper and sage. Cook, stirring constantly, for about 1 minute, or until the spinach is just wilted. Stir in pine nuts.In a bowl, whisk milk and eggs together.Sprinkle 1/4 cup of the cheese mixture on the piecrust. Top with half of the spinach mixture. Place potato slices on top of spinach. Add half remaining cheese mixture and then remaining spinach mixture. Top with remaining cheese.Place the pie pan on a sheet pan. Carefully pour in milk mixture. Bake for 45 to 50 minutes, until a knife inserted into the center comes out clean. Cool slightly before cutting.

Quiche is one of those dishes that I never imagined I would end up loving this much. In my house I always grew up with eggs on toast, toad in a hole and fritatta’s, all lovingly made by my mum and grandma for me. But one day I found this recipe and had to make it. It was perfect, there was a package of spinach about to go bad sitting in the fridge, so instead of throwing it out I threw it in a pan with olive oil and garlic and turned it into a quiche. It is know a dish that I know my heart and could probably do it with my eyes closed - even with a hot oven and stove.

Spinach Quiche with Pine Nuts

Ingredients: 
  • 1 frozen 9-inch ready-made whole wheat piecrust
  • 1 1/2 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 large cloves garlic, sliced
  • 6 cups fresh spinach leaves, washed and dried
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 1 teaspoon dried sage or 1 tablespoon fresh sage, chopped
  •  3 tablespoons pine nuts, toasted
  • 1/2 cup cheddar cheese, grated
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 large red potato, steamed until firm-tender, sliced 1/4-inch thick
Method: 

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Remove piecrust from the freezer and thaw for ten minutes. Prick the bottom with a fork and bake for 7 to 10 minutes, until lightly browned. Remove crust from the oven to cool.

Heat olive oil in a medium sauté pan. Add garlic, spinach, salt, pepper and sage. Cook, stirring constantly, for about 1 minute, or until the spinach is just wilted. Stir in pine nuts.

In a bowl, whisk milk and eggs together.

Sprinkle 1/4 cup of the cheese mixture on the piecrust. Top with half of the spinach mixture.
Place potato slices on top of spinach. Add half remaining cheese mixture and then remaining spinach mixture. Top with remaining cheese.

Place the pie pan on a sheet pan. Carefully pour in milk mixture. Bake for 45 to 50 minutes, until a knife inserted into the center comes out clean. Cool slightly before cutting.

Finally after a long and brutal winter the warm weather has arrived. Ontario is no longer living in fear of the polar vortex, and we celebrated by visiting a vineyard. We didn’t exactly go for the wine, none of us are wine drinkers, really we just wanted a pretty garden and a clear blue sky.

April 13th, 2014
Yes this is old news, but time was needed to digest the fact that The Little Mermaid will once more be up on the big screen.
As a child my favourite Disney Princess was Ariel (and Belle). There are even embarrassing Halloween pictures of me dressed up as her. Not to mention that my nickname for my little brother (Guppy) came from the movie - “Flounder, you’re such a guppy”. Yes, I was obsessed. Still am, as can be seen from my still-packaged Barbie doll, Christmas tree ornament and annual Ariel birthday cards from people who know me best.
Fine, it will not be the Disnified version, full of catchy songs, bright colours and the stereotypical happy ending. But at twenty-something, I’m pretty sure I can handle the darkness of the Anderson original. In fact, I welcome it, because it leaves more to discuss. There is nothing better than a story that questions peoples logic and reasoning. I mean really, why does she not stab the prince??? He obviously does not love her - in that way anyway. 
That is not even mentioning the point that Sofia Coppola will be directing it! Something that ups the excitement factor even more. I can’t begin to count the number of times I have seen Marie Antionette and raved about its soundtrack. Coppola could be the perfect director for what I want this new version of Mermaid to be, girly, with great music and a dark edge that is befitting of an older audience.
Just please do not cast Amanda Seyfried as Ariel. I would have to retract gushing statement of excitement for the movie.

Yes this is old news, but time was needed to digest the fact that The Little Mermaid will once more be up on the big screen.

As a child my favourite Disney Princess was Ariel (and Belle). There are even embarrassing Halloween pictures of me dressed up as her. Not to mention that my nickname for my little brother (Guppy) came from the movie - “Flounder, you’re such a guppy”. Yes, I was obsessed. Still am, as can be seen from my still-packaged Barbie doll, Christmas tree ornament and annual Ariel birthday cards from people who know me best.

Fine, it will not be the Disnified version, full of catchy songs, bright colours and the stereotypical happy ending. But at twenty-something, I’m pretty sure I can handle the darkness of the Anderson original. In fact, I welcome it, because it leaves more to discuss. There is nothing better than a story that questions peoples logic and reasoning. I mean really, why does she not stab the prince??? He obviously does not love her - in that way anyway.

That is not even mentioning the point that Sofia Coppola will be directing it! Something that ups the excitement factor even more. I can’t begin to count the number of times I have seen Marie Antionette and raved about its soundtrack. Coppola could be the perfect director for what I want this new version of Mermaid to be, girly, with great music and a dark edge that is befitting of an older audience.

Just please do not cast Amanda Seyfried as Ariel. I would have to retract gushing statement of excitement for the movie.

Learn to Stitch with Buttons

This is from second year university!! - wow that is a throwback. I had just started to experiment with the idea of bringing my love of embroidery into my school work and this was the result. To this day I still love this project. Sometimes I plan to redo it my actually embroidering the letters into cloth, but still have not gotten around to it.

March 9th, 2014
March 6th, 2014

(Source: sweatywisdom, via crvstalize)

March 5th, 2014
March 4th, 2014
thatsundaylifestyle:

STUFFED ANIMAL/BAGEL. FOR THE KIDS.

thatsundaylifestyle:

STUFFED ANIMAL/BAGEL. FOR THE KIDS.

(Source: textileartlove)

February 26th, 2014
Martha Stewart Living March 2014

Martha Stewart Living March 2014

February 23rd, 2014

Eliza Bennett - A woman’s work is never done, 2011Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand. By using the technique of embroidery, traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of it’s opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy. Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ancillary jobs such as cleaning, caring, and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’.

Eliza Bennett - A woman’s work is never done, 2011

Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand. By using the technique of embroidery, traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of it’s opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy. Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ancillary jobs such as cleaning, caring, and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’.

February 22nd, 2014
February 21st, 2014

(Source: karinyamasaki, via elemenopeep)

February 18th, 2014